Monday, September 30, 2013

Monday Pain

Mondays are painful, why not share the pain?


Friday, September 27, 2013

DIY Week: How to paint your bike

Have you ever found an incredibly good deal on a bike, or seen an old bicycle that you really wanted to have but didn't like the color or the paint was all chipped? Or if you just wanted to make your bike more original (by painting it neon colors). Don't lose hope. Here is how to paint an old bike frame with a professional-looking finish.




http://www.wikihow.com/Paint-a-Bike

Thursday, September 26, 2013

DIY Week: Build a ladder bridge




Some great examples of proper trail building techniques via the North Shore Mountain Bike Association.




http://nsmba.ca/structures/structuresgood.htm



Monday, September 23, 2013

DIY Week: Build a bike fender out of a plastic jug

It's a nice variant on the old school 2L pop bottle fender mounted on the frame.  This one uses laundry soap bottles and is actually mounted into the fork crown.

The instructions suggest using a star fangled nut, but those are a royal pain to remove, I would suggest their alternate solution of using a rubber expander to mount it.




I personally think they will look much better with some matte black spray, but in either case, the fender does come out looking like it started life as a fender, not a soap container.

Full instructions here,

http://www.instructables.com/id/cool-bike-fender-for-free/?ALLSTEPS

Monday Pain

Mondays are painful so why not share the pain?


Thursday, September 19, 2013

Tip Thursdays: When dogs attack...

Any cyclist who's spent any time on the roads, particularly outside of the cities, has at some point been chased by a dog.

If your usual route has a dog that regularly goes after you, consider bringing one of your water bottles filled with vinegar.  In most cases a quick shot of vinegar to the face will stop the dog in it's tracks without hurting anybody (dog included).   Just make sure you remember which bottle is which or you might be in for an unpleasant surprise.

Alternatively if you don't have a regular dog, your normal water bottle might help deter the dog, if not your best bet is to get away quickly, if you can't out run the dog, dismount and keep the bike between you and the dog.  Yell at the dog as loudly and forcefully as you can to get home.  Many dogs will respond to this, but if nothing else the owner will probably hear and come get their dog back in line.

A helmet nod goes out to the One-armed Ironman for the tip.



Got a tip for Tip Thursday?  Let me know at ricky@thebike.ca!



Wednesday, September 18, 2013

101 Bicycle Maintenance Tips


GOOD RULES OF THUMB 
1 Never loan tools to friends.

2 If it’s threaded, grease it.

3 You can’t properly adjust a bicycle that is dirty and not lubricated.

4 Perfect the art of changing a flat. No excuses.

5 Nylon tire levers are better than metal ones. 

6 Measure twice, then cut. This especially goes for steerer tubes and integrated seatposts. 

 7 When disassembling something, keep track of the order in which you remove parts. It takes the mystery out of putting it back together. 

8 Check tire pressure before every ride, especially if you’re running tubeless. 

9 The three most important tools to have on a ride: a multitool with a chain breaker, a pump or CO2, and a patch kit or tube. 

10 When tinkering with anything near your cranks, shift into the big ring first so you don’t mangle your hand on the chainring teeth. 

SHAKES, RATTLES, AND ROLLS 
11 Periodically check for bearing play in your headset, hubs, and cranks. To check your headset, squeeze the front brake and rock your bike fore and aft. For wheel and crank bearings, pull the wheel or crank side to side. If you feel a wiggle, your component needs an adjustment. Don’t ignore it, or the problem will get bigger and more expensive. 

12 Using a torque wrench (see No. 81), check the tightness of your crank bolts every month. If you just bought a new bike, check them after every ride for the first week. 

13 After you box your bike for travel but before you seal it, give it a side-to-side shake to note any loose or rattling parts. Then secure them. 

14 Loctite Threadlocker­ Blue 242 is a must-have­ accessory for bolts that assemble using standard hand tools. It seals threaded fasteners and keeps them from rattling loose due to vibration.



See the rest over at Bicycling.com

http://www.bicycling.com/maintenance/repair-maintenance/101-bike-maintenance-tips

Monday, September 16, 2013

Monday Pain

Mondays are painful, why not share the pain?